Sunday, 10 February 2008

INTERROGATING THE BLOGOSPHERE (I)


Six months have passed since my last post in what turned out to be a very brief voluntary collaboration with GVO. So, I saw it fit to initiate this series of reflections on my life in the blogosphere so far with that experience.

When I started this journey in the blogosphere just over a year ago, I knew virtually nothing about it. I had accidentally come across one or two blogs before and that was it. So, when I was invited by the Sub-Saharan Africa editor of GVO to collaborate with them, covering the "Portuguese-speaking African countries", it took me a while to accept it but I eventually decided to take on the challenge – and how I knew from the beginning how much of a challenge it would be! I took it mainly as an opportunity to, as I gradually got to know the “lusosphere”, report about it, in English, to the global online community. So, to me it was all about “juntar o util ao agradavel”.

I set out without any particular agenda whatsoever, if not just because I didn’t know at all what I was about to find. But I had a very clear idea, guided by the GVO Manifesto and Mission Statement, that my work would be aimed at “shining light on places and people other media often ignore (…) to make sense of it all, and to highlight things that bloggers are saying which mainstream media may not be reporting (…) to help people speak out in places where powerful forces would prevent them from doing so (…) and to enable more people whose voices and views are not heard to speak out online.”

Well, I may have arrived at the blogosphere as naïve as a nun straight out of a convent, but I was (am) all but naïve about the real world. A real world where I have seen so many organisations, projects and people theoretically motivated by some of the most noble of principles, aims and objectives but, given the opportunities created by lack of transparency and accountability, the pursuit of individual agendas, or other factors such as ignorance, short-sightedness, personal insecurities and lack of professionalism, in practice easily turn into arrogant, megalomaniac, insensitive monsters practicing the exact opposite of what they claim to profess.

More to the point: even though, at the start of my “mission” with GVO, I had gone through a very rough path of conflicts with pornographic, racist and extreme-right sectors of the “lusosphere” who seemed not to have any other purpose in life than to attempt by all means necessary to harass me and tarnish my reputation in the blogosphere, both in mine and other blogs, I had no intention of, on my reporting for GVO, sidelining anyone who might have sided with them, by words, deeds or omissions, provided that their blog posts met the GVO principles and objectives – and this much I clearly stated in the introduction to my first post for GVO.

So, I started with a blog based in Portugal through which the global world, using its comprehensive blogroll, could access virtually the entire “lusosphere”. Thereafter, my main concern was to give utmost priority to bloggers based in the countries I was supposed to cover. This led me to follow up my reporting with the first blog I found in the Mozambican blogosphere, and then with one of the few blogs reporting from inside Angola. My reporting took the form of “bloggers profiles” mainly because of the relatively fewer number of blogs in those countries and their geographical and thematic dispersion. In my choices, there were no considerations of race, gender, politico-ideological orientation or any other subjective factors. There was, however, a clear concern with whether the issues they were blogging about were of the kind that may not be reported by the mainstream media, either in the respective countries or abroad.

And this is where things got complicated. Firstly, what is exactly the “mainstream media”? Does it include the same type of outlets in New York, Lisbon, Luanda, Boston, Porto, Brazilia, Maputo, London, Praia, Vila Nova de Gaia, Rio, Lubango or Dili? Secondly, to what extent can a blogger based in Portugal, USA, UK or Cabo Verde accurately reflect the voices of communities and individual citizens in N’Dalatando, Quelimane or Principe, whose concerns might not be heard online? Can such a blogger in any case reflect them better than another one based closer to those communities, unless he visits them regularly or has close family, friendship, or professional ties with them? Thirdly, who gets to determine, and under whose criteria, which are “the most interesting conversations and perspectives emerging from citizens’ media around the world”, as per the GVO “Primary Goals”?

Before attempting to answer any of these questions, let me talk about the reactions to my third, and eventually last, post for GVO. It was attacked, or rather, I was attacked because of it, on that blog by a group of lusophone bloggers led by one certain Orlando Castro (OC) and including the first blogger I had covered for GVO, on the absolutely groundless and personally insulting libel that “unlike the author of that blog, I had fled Angola without thinking!” Well, this is someone I don’t know and doesn’t know me personally apart from the blogosphere (the same applying to all the bloggers I’ve come across so far) and with whom, I must stress, I never had exchanged any comments or dialogues, directly or indirectly (in fact, I only got to properly know his blog after taking that blow on the stomach from him completely out of the blue) and I might even, as I went on with my work, if allowed to, at some point cover his and his group’s blogs.

The origin of that totally unprovoked and absurd libellous attack about my alleged “flight” from Angola, with or without thinking, is well determined in the “lusosphere”, as are the motivations of its author, and I had it thrown at my face before by the people who have been keeping me under siege in the blogosphere and have forced me to temporarily restrict access to my blog and implement comment moderation on it (costing me a considerable number of visitors, commentators, friends and contributors) and also forced me to get an interview I had given to the blog Szavanna about Angolan music withdrawn.
However, to this day I struggle to understand what led OC to come up with it at that particular blog I covered for GVO. “Is it because I is black?”, as Ali G would ask, or was it because, unlike the previous two bloggers I had covered, the owner of that blog happens to be black? Or was it because I am a woman? Was it because that was the first Angolan-based blog I covered? Or did he think that his blog should have been the first to be covered? Or was it something to do with the subject matter of the post covered itself? I honestly don’t know.

What I have no doubts about is that OC and his followers descended there like a tonne of bricks upon me mainly to personally profit in one way or another from the exposure that blog would gain as a result of its appearance on GVO – interestingly enough, even before I started volunteering for GVO, I had made a comment on that blog (although only to get back a cold shoulder from its author, which I totally failed to understand at the time) and had at some stage linked it on my blog; however I don’t remember ever seeing there before a comment by OC or his friends, or the blog in question figuring in their blogrolls, or vice-versa.

However, the most disturbing of it all for me was that, as if I were carelessly poking a cobra with a very short stick, the supposed potential beneficiary of my voluntary time, effort and attention in that particular instance, in a fit of irrational hatred that I can only understand as the result of the most explosive mixture of ignorance, bad manners, inferiority and subaltern complexes and inversed racism, sided with OC against me, thus effectively behaving like a “turkey voting for Christmas”. This surely caught the attention of someone, somewhere, at GVO, who found in my attackers “the courage of their convictions”! The result?*

Still had any doubts that crime (in this case, opportunism, racism, bullying, intrigue, slander, defamation and libel) actually does pay? So, who is this “suppa duppa dude”, who, clearly as a reward for acting as a deranged sniper bent on forcing me out of my work with GVO and ultimately drive me offline, for allegedly “having fled my country of origin”, all of a sudden started to appear on GVO (I don’t recall his blog ever being mentioned there before) as the “undisputed champion” of blogging about Angola, while continuing undeterred with his vicious, venomous attacks, open or veiled, against me in association with his allies?

For all I know, he is a “professional journalist” (or at least he displays his Portuguese Journalists’ Union card number on his blog profile) who, together with other two bloggers who form among themselves an “exclusive and closed mutual appreciation society” of sorts, works for the mainstream online media outlet “Noticias Lusofonas”, based in Portugal. So, how likely is it that whatever issues he blogs about might not be reported by mainstream media? He is based in an interior locality of Portugal, Vila Nova de Gaia, not even in the capital, Lisboa, or any of the other major cities in the country, such as Porto, Setubal, Faro or Coimbra, where he could have some exposure to and direct contact with the African communities whose majority is based in those centres. So, how reliable can his blog be to reflect the voices of those citizens and of their families in Africa to the global world?

I also happen to know that OC is part of a group of former Portuguese settlers (colonos) who, in 1974, joined UNITA, because its president, Jonas Savimbi, backed by apartheid South Africa, presented himself to them as “the real and only safeguard of white interests in Angola”, while allegedly saying the exact opposite in his speeches in his mother tongue, Umbundu, which most of the white population couldn’t understand (yes, so much for the ‘lusofonia’…). However, he was not among the few whites who stayed in the country after independence in 1975, either fighting Savimbi’s battles on the ground, or on the other side enduring the effects of the long fratricide war, directly or indirectly, as my family and I did, together with the vast majority of Angolans. He fled the country.

Exactly, with or without thinking, he fled Angola in 1975 and never went back! Along the last 30 years, most of Savimbi’s white supporters, inside or outside the country, abandoned his ranks and some are now amongst his main detractors, having become stern defenders of the idea (right or wrong, that’s not what I’m discussing here) that if white interests were ever safeguarded in Angola by any political force, it was by the ruling party, MPLA, and that only they themselves could have done better. However, through his writings, it becomes apparent that he might go back only when “they themselves are in a position of power to do it, because they do it better!” In the meantime, and unlike even some of the most deeply-rooted UNITA militants, he continues to this day to refer to Savimbi as “My President”! So, that’s OC for you.

Most of his and his closest allies’ blog posts about African issues reflect the mentality of those around the world who attribute all African problems exclusively to the “innate incapability” of Africans – to whom he often refers indiscriminately as “monkeys who keep falling from trees because they have to take off one of their shoes in order to be able to count to 12…” – and pretend to pass themselves as “the voices of the voiceless” with an unmistakable, if hidden, ideological agenda: that of advancing, by hook, by crook, or by fluke, the cause of “recolonisation”. His blogging about Angola is all mainly based on reports by the mainstream media in Angola or Portugal and, as a result of that, his opinions are at best secondary and derivative and at worst little more than fabrications of a “fertile imagination”.

He seldom, if ever, reveals “his sources” on the ground, either for the texts or the pictures, (in fact, at least once he used one of my exclusive pictures but, unlike his closest friend, didn't acknowledge it), he publishes about Angola, most of which are not real illustrations of the “facts” and locations he purports to talk about, but selectively chosen to depict the worst possible images of Africa, all invariably reminiscent of the great draught and famine in the Ethiopia of the ‘80s, widely published by the western mainstream media and continually disseminated throughout certain sectors in the blogosphere as the “trademark” image of all countries in Africa, all the time. So, is “citizen’s media” according to GVO based on facts lived and observed in loco, or on second or third-hand, recycled opinion, and clichés produced at a long and safe geographical, cultural and temporal distance?

Now, before I proceed to attempt to find answers to the questions I have been posing, let me say that I am not fighting my causes, whatever they may be, through this. I’ve been fighting my causes, some worthy, others less so, throughout my life by a variety of legitimate means, and achieving whatever goals I might have set to myself in the blogosphere is not dependent on the ‘good will’ of anyone – certainly not anyone at GVO. So, you might ask why am I then making such a fuss about all this, particularly having said at the time that I would rather not elaborate on the reasons for my decision to end my collaboration with GVO? Isn’t this going to generate even more gratuitous publicity and “popular support” for the villains in this story? Shouldn’t I know better, for my blog and my own’s sake, than “messing with the big guys”?

My answer is very simple: because, my dear friends, this is my blog! This is the space where I’m supposed to freely talk about the things that affect me, my life, my family and friends in Africa and the society(ies), real or virtual, geographically close or distant, that I happen to live in, whenever I feel it necessary and appropriate to do so, without fear of persecution, backlash, personal vendettas or any other kind of retaliation.

Ultimately, I believe that it is my right and my duty to interrogate, and hopefully unveil, some of the processes through which certain “powers that be” actually “come to be” to begin with… before some of us start issuing “calls for recolonisation”! Otherwise, what would the blogosphere be for, or is all about, after all?
And, actually, things have reached a point where I have nothing to lose…


*N.B.: To be accurate, in all 6 instances where my blog appears on GVO links during the period under analysis, it was not on the initiative of the Portuguese-language editorial team. So, they shouldn't be included in this graph because, for all intents and purposes, this blog was excluded from their reporting in the last six months.


Six months have passed since my last post in what turned out to be a very brief voluntary collaboration with GVO. So, I saw it fit to initiate this series of reflections on my life in the blogosphere so far with that experience.

When I started this journey in the blogosphere just over a year ago, I knew virtually nothing about it. I had accidentally come across one or two blogs before and that was it. So, when I was invited by the Sub-Saharan Africa editor of GVO to collaborate with them, covering the "Portuguese-speaking African countries", it took me a while to accept it but I eventually decided to take on the challenge – and how I knew from the beginning how much of a challenge it would be! I took it mainly as an opportunity to, as I gradually got to know the “lusosphere”, report about it, in English, to the global online community. So, to me it was all about “juntar o util ao agradavel”.

I set out without any particular agenda whatsoever, if not just because I didn’t know at all what I was about to find. But I had a very clear idea, guided by the GVO Manifesto and Mission Statement, that my work would be aimed at “shining light on places and people other media often ignore (…) to make sense of it all, and to highlight things that bloggers are saying which mainstream media may not be reporting (…) to help people speak out in places where powerful forces would prevent them from doing so (…) and to enable more people whose voices and views are not heard to speak out online.”

Well, I may have arrived at the blogosphere as naïve as a nun straight out of a convent, but I was (am) all but naïve about the real world. A real world where I have seen so many organisations, projects and people theoretically motivated by some of the most noble of principles, aims and objectives but, given the opportunities created by lack of transparency and accountability, the pursuit of individual agendas, or other factors such as ignorance, short-sightedness, personal insecurities and lack of professionalism, in practice easily turn into arrogant, megalomaniac, insensitive monsters practicing the exact opposite of what they claim to profess.

More to the point: even though, at the start of my “mission” with GVO, I had gone through a very rough path of conflicts with pornographic, racist and extreme-right sectors of the “lusosphere” who seemed not to have any other purpose in life than to attempt by all means necessary to harass me and tarnish my reputation in the blogosphere, both in mine and other blogs, I had no intention of, on my reporting for GVO, sidelining anyone who might have sided with them, by words, deeds or omissions, provided that their blog posts met the GVO principles and objectives – and this much I clearly stated in the introduction to my first post for GVO.

So, I started with a blog based in Portugal through which the global world, using its comprehensive blogroll, could access virtually the entire “lusosphere”. Thereafter, my main concern was to give utmost priority to bloggers based in the countries I was supposed to cover. This led me to follow up my reporting with the first blog I found in the Mozambican blogosphere, and then with one of the few blogs reporting from inside Angola. My reporting took the form of “bloggers profiles” mainly because of the relatively fewer number of blogs in those countries and their geographical and thematic dispersion. In my choices, there were no considerations of race, gender, politico-ideological orientation or any other subjective factors. There was, however, a clear concern with whether the issues they were blogging about were of the kind that may not be reported by the mainstream media, either in the respective countries or abroad.

And this is where things got complicated. Firstly, what is exactly the “mainstream media”? Does it include the same type of outlets in New York, Lisbon, Luanda, Boston, Porto, Brazilia, Maputo, London, Praia, Vila Nova de Gaia, Rio, Lubango or Dili? Secondly, to what extent can a blogger based in Portugal, USA, UK or Cabo Verde accurately reflect the voices of communities and individual citizens in N’Dalatando, Quelimane or Principe, whose concerns might not be heard online? Can such a blogger in any case reflect them better than another one based closer to those communities, unless he visits them regularly or has close family, friendship, or professional ties with them? Thirdly, who gets to determine, and under whose criteria, which are “the most interesting conversations and perspectives emerging from citizens’ media around the world”, as per the GVO “Primary Goals”?

Before attempting to answer any of these questions, let me talk about the reactions to my third, and eventually last, post for GVO. It was attacked, or rather, I was attacked because of it, on that blog by a group of lusophone bloggers led by one certain Orlando Castro (OC) and including the first blogger I had covered for GVO, on the absolutely groundless and personally insulting libel that “unlike the author of that blog, I had fled Angola without thinking!” Well, this is someone I don’t know and doesn’t know me personally apart from the blogosphere (the same applying to all the bloggers I’ve come across so far) and with whom, I must stress, I never had exchanged any comments or dialogues, directly or indirectly (in fact, I only got to properly know his blog after taking that blow on the stomach from him completely out of the blue) and I might even, as I went on with my work, if allowed to, at some point cover his and his group’s blogs.

The origin of that totally unprovoked and absurd libellous attack about my alleged “flight” from Angola, with or without thinking, is well determined in the “lusosphere”, as are the motivations of its author, and I had it thrown at my face before by the people who have been keeping me under siege in the blogosphere and have forced me to temporarily restrict access to my blog and implement comment moderation on it (costing me a considerable number of visitors, commentators, friends and contributors) and also forced me to get an interview I had given to the blog Szavanna about Angolan music withdrawn.
However, to this day I struggle to understand what led OC to come up with it at that particular blog I covered for GVO. “Is it because I is black?”, as Ali G would ask, or was it because, unlike the previous two bloggers I had covered, the owner of that blog happens to be black? Or was it because I am a woman? Was it because that was the first Angolan-based blog I covered? Or did he think that his blog should have been the first to be covered? Or was it something to do with the subject matter of the post covered itself? I honestly don’t know.

What I have no doubts about is that OC and his followers descended there like a tonne of bricks upon me mainly to personally profit in one way or another from the exposure that blog would gain as a result of its appearance on GVO – interestingly enough, even before I started volunteering for GVO, I had made a comment on that blog (although only to get back a cold shoulder from its author, which I totally failed to understand at the time) and had at some stage linked it on my blog; however I don’t remember ever seeing there before a comment by OC or his friends, or the blog in question figuring in their blogrolls, or vice-versa.

However, the most disturbing of it all for me was that, as if I were carelessly poking a cobra with a very short stick, the supposed potential beneficiary of my voluntary time, effort and attention in that particular instance, in a fit of irrational hatred that I can only understand as the result of the most explosive mixture of ignorance, bad manners, inferiority and subaltern complexes and inversed racism, sided with OC against me, thus effectively behaving like a “turkey voting for Christmas”. This surely caught the attention of someone, somewhere, at GVO, who found in my attackers “the courage of their convictions”! The result?*

Still had any doubts that crime (in this case, opportunism, racism, bullying, intrigue, slander, defamation and libel) actually does pay? So, who is this “suppa duppa dude”, who, clearly as a reward for acting as a deranged sniper bent on forcing me out of my work with GVO and ultimately drive me offline, for allegedly “having fled my country of origin”, all of a sudden started to appear on GVO (I don’t recall his blog ever being mentioned there before) as the “undisputed champion” of blogging about Angola, while continuing undeterred with his vicious, venomous attacks, open or veiled, against me in association with his allies?

For all I know, he is a “professional journalist” (or at least he displays his Portuguese Journalists’ Union card number on his blog profile) who, together with other two bloggers who form among themselves an “exclusive and closed mutual appreciation society” of sorts, works for the mainstream online media outlet “Noticias Lusofonas”, based in Portugal. So, how likely is it that whatever issues he blogs about might not be reported by mainstream media? He is based in an interior locality of Portugal, Vila Nova de Gaia, not even in the capital, Lisboa, or any of the other major cities in the country, such as Porto, Setubal, Faro or Coimbra, where he could have some exposure to and direct contact with the African communities whose majority is based in those centres. So, how reliable can his blog be to reflect the voices of those citizens and of their families in Africa to the global world?

I also happen to know that OC is part of a group of former Portuguese settlers (colonos) who, in 1974, joined UNITA, because its president, Jonas Savimbi, backed by apartheid South Africa, presented himself to them as “the real and only safeguard of white interests in Angola”, while allegedly saying the exact opposite in his speeches in his mother tongue, Umbundu, which most of the white population couldn’t understand (yes, so much for the ‘lusofonia’…). However, he was not among the few whites who stayed in the country after independence in 1975, either fighting Savimbi’s battles on the ground, or on the other side enduring the effects of the long fratricide war, directly or indirectly, as my family and I did, together with the vast majority of Angolans. He fled the country.

Exactly, with or without thinking, he fled Angola in 1975 and never went back! Along the last 30 years, most of Savimbi’s white supporters, inside or outside the country, abandoned his ranks and some are now amongst his main detractors, having become stern defenders of the idea (right or wrong, that’s not what I’m discussing here) that if white interests were ever safeguarded in Angola by any political force, it was by the ruling party, MPLA, and that only they themselves could have done better. However, through his writings, it becomes apparent that he might go back only when “they themselves are in a position of power to do it, because they do it better!” In the meantime, and unlike even some of the most deeply-rooted UNITA militants, he continues to this day to refer to Savimbi as “My President”! So, that’s OC for you.

Most of his and his closest allies’ blog posts about African issues reflect the mentality of those around the world who attribute all African problems exclusively to the “innate incapability” of Africans – to whom he often refers indiscriminately as “monkeys who keep falling from trees because they have to take off one of their shoes in order to be able to count to 12…” – and pretend to pass themselves as “the voices of the voiceless” with an unmistakable, if hidden, ideological agenda: that of advancing, by hook, by crook, or by fluke, the cause of “recolonisation”. His blogging about Angola is all mainly based on reports by the mainstream media in Angola or Portugal and, as a result of that, his opinions are at best secondary and derivative and at worst little more than fabrications of a “fertile imagination”.

He seldom, if ever, reveals “his sources” on the ground, either for the texts or the pictures, (in fact, at least once he used one of my exclusive pictures but, unlike his closest friend, didn't acknowledge it), he publishes about Angola, most of which are not real illustrations of the “facts” and locations he purports to talk about, but selectively chosen to depict the worst possible images of Africa, all invariably reminiscent of the great draught and famine in the Ethiopia of the ‘80s, widely published by the western mainstream media and continually disseminated throughout certain sectors in the blogosphere as the “trademark” image of all countries in Africa, all the time. So, is “citizen’s media” according to GVO based on facts lived and observed in loco, or on second or third-hand, recycled opinion, and clichés produced at a long and safe geographical, cultural and temporal distance?

Now, before I proceed to attempt to find answers to the questions I have been posing, let me say that I am not fighting my causes, whatever they may be, through this. I’ve been fighting my causes, some worthy, others less so, throughout my life by a variety of legitimate means, and achieving whatever goals I might have set to myself in the blogosphere is not dependent on the ‘good will’ of anyone – certainly not anyone at GVO. So, you might ask why am I then making such a fuss about all this, particularly having said at the time that I would rather not elaborate on the reasons for my decision to end my collaboration with GVO? Isn’t this going to generate even more gratuitous publicity and “popular support” for the villains in this story? Shouldn’t I know better, for my blog and my own’s sake, than “messing with the big guys”?

My answer is very simple: because, my dear friends, this is my blog! This is the space where I’m supposed to freely talk about the things that affect me, my life, my family and friends in Africa and the society(ies), real or virtual, geographically close or distant, that I happen to live in, whenever I feel it necessary and appropriate to do so, without fear of persecution, backlash, personal vendettas or any other kind of retaliation.

Ultimately, I believe that it is my right and my duty to interrogate, and hopefully unveil, some of the processes through which certain “powers that be” actually “come to be” to begin with… before some of us start issuing “calls for recolonisation”! Otherwise, what would the blogosphere be for, or is all about, after all?
And, actually, things have reached a point where I have nothing to lose…


*N.B.: To be accurate, in all 6 instances where my blog appears on GVO links during the period under analysis, it was not on the initiative of the Portuguese-language editorial team. So, they shouldn't be included in this graph because, for all intents and purposes, this blog was excluded from their reporting in the last six months.

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

Congratulations, once again! your latest article is the undeniable proof of 'a tongue as fit as a butcher's dog'. Cold, objective reasoning seasoned with a spicy sharp analitical punch is the recipe for a warm, mouth-watering gourmet for the brain. Those of us who rejoice in such awakening of the senses say "it is a dish worth waiting for". My advice to Mr OC and the likes, however... "savour it with a glass of water nearby, might be too hot to handle"!

Anonymous said...

“A real world where I have seen so many organisations, projects and people theoretically motivated by some of the most noble of principles, aims and objectives but, given the opportunities created by lack of transparency and accountability, the pursuit of individual agendas, or other factors such as ignorance, personal insecurities and lack of professionalism, in practice easily turn into arrogant, megalomaniac, insensitive monsters practicing the exact opposite of what they claim to profess.”

You hit the nail on the head there. That’s what worries me about the future of the blogosphere, or at least large parts of it. At least with the conventional media you know who to hold accountable for any mischief.

But, please, don’t give up; your work is highly appreciated.

T. Wyatt

sokari said...

I also had a relatively brief collaboration with GVO and left in rather acrimonious circumstances although personally I feel vindicated. There have always been issues with this organisation in terms of whose voices are heard and who represents who. I think one of their problems is they are trying to be all things to all people and that can never be and their lack of willingness to take a position in the name of pretentious objectivity. Reuters is not objective neither is the Mail & Guardian or any other publication - just let us know your stance rather than pretend you dont have any!

Again thanks for raising these questions on your blog which is excellent and I should visit more often!

Koluki said...

Anonymous: Many thanks for your… how can I put it, fierce (?) observations!

T. Wyatt: Indeed, that’s one of my main concerns, particularly when there are so many anonymous commentators and bloggers around…

Sokari: Thanks very much for your input to this issue. I didn’t know that you had been so closely involved with GVO, or that you were their first SSA editor, less still that you left in acrimonious terms.
So, it’s good to know that I wasn’t just overreacting to something that could be described as “a series of minor and inconsequential accidents”…
As for the objectivity, or lack thereof, here are a couple of quotations that could be applied to this case:

"I'm not a slave to objectivity. I'm never quite sure what it means. And it means different things to different people."
Peter Jennings

"I think perfect objectivity is an unrealistic goal; fairness, however, is not."
Michael Pollan

P.S.: You are most welcome to visit and comment more often.

Koluki said...

Just another interesting quotation for good measure:

"The corporate grip on opinion in the United States is one of the wonders of the Western world. No First World country has ever managed to eliminate so entirely from its media all objectivity - much less dissent."
Gore Vidal